Why kids fell in love with Frozen and never “let it go”?

ElsaSome of you had experienced the “Frozen Fatigue” which is a condition that makes moms and dads feel like they are going to go ABSOLUTELY INSANE if they have to listen to the Frozen soundtrack one more time …     So what strategies made Frozen a successful brand for a movie, a song and lots and lots of products? What made Frozen become Disney’s highest-grossing animated movie of all time? The uniqueness of the product and the deep understanding of children’s psychology (The Consumer): Frozen had the classical Disney spirit, the modern snow-white, with the funny and adorable Olaf helping out Alf The baddie in the movie wasn’t a typical baddie, it was a kind-hearted princess who had uncontrollable power, she meant well but caused harm, every person relates to that. The story was about two sisters, with the older one ignoring the younger, this situation is familiar to any child either with a brother or a sister or even with a friend, someone who they really love and doesn’t want to play with them anymore, and as a child you don’t know why? I know I’ve been there … The Marketing Strategy: The Initial Marketing Campaign was extremely successful in highlighting the story’s uniqueness. The timing of the release in November, just before the holiday season, was perfect. Allowing their music to go viral over the social media, everyone can hear “let it go” everywhere, allowing the global spread of the song. The Franchising Strategy: Girls just love a princess, and Frozen had two!Esla and Anna Products were everywhere; Frozen bags, Frozen toys, Frozen coloring books; healthy snacks with Frozen branding, and the list goes on and on … The Companies Strategy: According to Bob Iger, Walt Disney’s CEO, the three pillars of the company’s strategy are: • Creating high-quality, branded content and experiences • Embrace technology and use it aggressively to enhance the quality of their product and thus the consumer experience • To invest much more aggressively in global growth Were these strategies the only reason for this phenomenal success? References: http://crowdignite.momtastic.com/8_signs_you_have_frozen_fatigue http://www.newyorker.com/science/maria-konnikova/how-frozen-took-over-the-world http://www.vulture.com/2014/01/why-is-frozen-such-a-big-hit.html http://chiefexecutive.net/how-bob-iger-remade-the-house-that-walt-built

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21 thoughts on “Why kids fell in love with Frozen and never “let it go”?

  1. For me personally, I think the biggest strength of marketing for kids movies is their ability to also appeal to the parents. I don’t think I will ever be as amazed as I was watching kids movies as an adult and seeing the hidden innuendo strategically place for the adult viewers. Finding Nemo anyone? The implied AA themed fish are friends not food meeting with the unforgettable Bruce the shark and many others through out. Although, Frozen’s global success is based on its uniqueness and kids love for it. How do you get the kids there without also appealing to the parents?

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    • Totally agree, so have you watched the movie? From your point of view, what grabbed the attention of an adult to go and watch the movie?

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      • To be honest, I haven’t been to see Frozen in particular (sorry if this is too late), but I have been to other like Despicable Me, mainly because it something fun, lighthearted and it has the cleverly hidden innuendo. That’s what attracted me to it. As well as those clever trailers, with the snippets of what’s to come for the kids and for the adults!

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  2. Kids movies particularly have the potential generate or provide the platform for a range of additional product lines and categories not seen with other movies aimed at other age groups. There are a lot of FROZEN branded lunchboxes at my kids school. Interestingly my older child had a cars lunchbox and next year I am certain another movie will dominate the lunchbox market. To me that highlights the short product lifecycle of movies and associated merchandise where it they seem to come from no where to be everywhere and a year or so later its nowhere to be seen. Given the product costs of movie development the merchandise potential of kids movies must be extremely attractive to companies like Disney. Hence Disney’s purchase of PIXAR?

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    • so true, they have a relatively short lifecycle, hence they will produce FROZEN 2 ? do you believe it will have the same hit ?or perhaps increase the length of the product’s lifecycle ?

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  3. Frozen tapped into some advanced themes for kids, which I think many parents liked. The female characters are strong and brave, even while they are vulnerable. Anna & Kristof fall in love through shared experience and respect, rather than looks or coy eye-lash batting. And I loved it that the “baddie” – Prince Hans – was not given away until towards the end.

    It stood out from being just another princess movie. This positions the film well, and therefore the merchandising, so that parents go along for the ride when it comes to buying those lunchboxes, costumes and stickers. The movie, as a product, is ensured of a longer and more valuable life, too, with the success that it’s gained.

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      • I’d watch Frozen 2 with the kidgs to make sure I can talk things through with them, I tend to do that with most movies. But I won’t go out of my way to see it. I’m not big on merchandise, and have managed so far to avoid that spending. So far. ..

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  4. I don’t have kids…and I have to admit I watched it and enjoyed it. There are so many movies that do this…Shrek, Nemo, the list goes on. However in saying this I haven’t brought any of the associated merchandise, so while I have seen it I wouldn’t be an ideal customer as I give very little in the exchange.

    It is great the movies appeal to and entertains multiple segments, but the true value I would imagine has to come from resonating with the children, as they are ultimately the drivers of success of their sales.

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    • Thanks Laura, you are right , I have boys, yet they insisted to watch the movie and in Cinema! They didn’t buy any of the products as well with other girly movies they didn’t even bother mentioning, I’m still puzzled as to what made this movie appealing to other segments like adults and boys?

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      • I think it is the Production companies brand…as a child you are exposed to Disney/Pixar and you associate it will wholesome fun. I remember being 10 and going to see The Lion King with my parents, and loving it! As an adult I know I am going to enjoy the music, the sense of escapism (the real world isn’t so magical), the funny little puns the kids wont get…the consistancy of the product they produce is there, and I am a loyal customer to their product.

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  5. My daughter loves Frozen and every girl in her school loves it! I remember a dress up day last term, it was shocking to see over half girls in the school dressed in Frozen costume.. it’s insane!
    Other than all the reasons you mentioned above, I think another reason contributing to its success is that Frozen is a brand new princess story (unique new product) we’ve had in recent years. Girls are all kind of tired of Cinderella, Snow White and Beauty & beast etc., they have been told over and over again in books, TV and movies. It’s always good to have a change.

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    • Thanks Joan, I know , I couldn’t find a girl who wasn’t in love with Frozen !
      Mentioning that is a brand new story, Why do you believe so? although it’s a princess , with parents dead, so the begging is almost the same , in your mind what contributed most to the uniqueness ?

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  6. My kids are grown up so even though I worked in child care at the time of Frozens release & height of success, so I’m out of the loop of getting to parents through thier kids, after all they have the dollars to spend! I watched the dvd to try & get a grip of the frozen frenzy that had taken hold of the child care centre, 2 year olds were singing let it go & I had no idea that it even came from the movie! As I settled in to watch the movie, I prepared myself for the streotypical disney story. You can imagine my surprise & delight when the ending was anything but stereotypical. As mentioned previously strong & brave female characters & how true love could be for your sister not just a handsome prince who was really a baddy anyway. I think there may have even been a message about accepting people for who they are & not conforming to societal norms. I also agree with Victoria, I get so much more out of the cartoons I watched as a kid – they actually make more sense now than they did when I was kid. I gues I was lucky when my kids were younger, marketing & merchandising weren’t the thing & you had limited opportunites to buy stuff, I think the Harry Potter books & then franchise changed all that for my kids, by which time they had grown up & out of that phase.

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    • Thanks for sharing , and interesting that you mentioned that 2 years old were singing the song as well, from your experience do they understand the story of the movie? I have a niece, she was 2 then, and was totally in love with everything that was FROZEN branded, and couldn’t understand if she loved the story, the dresses or the songs ?

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  7. is it just for the kids? I loved it and watched it with my niece (who is obsessed). i think their success is appealing to the adults with adult jokes but at the same time entertaining the kids with all types of characters. Disney always makes smashing movies that apeal to all cohorts, young and old.

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  8. This movie really appealed to everyone from infants with its happy characters and catchy soundtrack to its underlying themes and messages to adults/parents.

    I think the main reason this movie was such a success was purely the Elsa character. Elsa’s transformation from destructive teen to the Snow Queen and hero was a makeover that a lot of the fan base can relate to. We don’t see too many female superheros in animated movies and it’s what this generation really needed.

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  9. I don’t have any children and haven’t seen this movie – but I could probably tell you a rough story line, most of the character’s names and sing all the songs! Not all Disney movies become a brand – you didn’t see Mulan lunch boxes and Mulan themed parties… do you think they appeal of this movie was marketing brilliance or luck???

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    • I’m trying to find out if luck played a part in this ? so if you didn’t watch the movie yet you know lots of those details , I would say kids around you and their parents were talking about it for a while, kids dressed up like Elsa , or holding Olaf, toddlers were obsessed with the movie although they didn’t understand the story, could it be the colours and the songs that were scientifically chosen to create such an obsession ? that would be marketing brilliance I think ?!

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  10. I usually like these sorts of movies – Shrek, Nemo, Ice Age and Madagascar are all favourites. after hearing about nothing but Frozen from a little person in my life I eventually sat down to watch it… I didn’t make it through the first song. I was not a fan, but based on these reviews perhaps I need to persevere and try again! I think part of Disney’s success is in their strategy, as you mentioned. Disney’s success comes from their ability to not only create high quality content, in this case the movie Frozen, but then translate that in to a real life experiences for possibly hundreds of thousands of little girls all over the world through branded products. The little lady I know has her very own Elsa dress, doll and recently had a Frozen themed birthday party. The other thing that i think contributes to the success of these sorts of kids movies is that there actually aren’t that many of them… at any one time there is usally only one kids movie on offer at the cinemas so it’s not like there is a lot of competition. It also helps that these movies are usually able to entertain the adults accompanying the kids.

    This article on what marketers should learn from Frozen is an interesting read: http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottdavis/2014/01/15/what-marketers-should-learn-from-disneys-frozen/

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